Home U+1F300 to U+1F5FF Miscellaneous Symbols and Pictographs
Glyph for U+1F3FA
Source: Noto Emoji

U+1F3FA Amphora

U+1F3FA was added to Unicode in version 8.0 (2015). It belongs to the block U+1F300 to U+1F5FF Miscellaneous Symbols and Pictographs in the U+10000 to U+1FFFF Supplementary Multilingual Plane.

This character is a Other Symbol and is commonly used, that is, in no specific script.

The glyph is not a composition. It has a Wide East Asian Width. In bidirectional context it acts as Other Neutral and is not mirrored. In text U+1F3FA behaves as Ideographic regarding line breaks. It has type Other for sentence and Other for word breaks. The Grapheme Cluster Break is Any.

The CLDR project labels this character “amphora” for use in screen reading software. It assigns additional tags, e.g. for search in emoji pickers: Aquarius, cooking, drink, jug, zodiac.

This character is designated as an emoji. It will be rendered as colorful emoji on conforming platforms. To reduce it to a monochrome character, you can combine it with Glyph for U+FE0E Variation Selector-15: 🏺︎ See the Emojipedia for more details on this character’s emoji properties.

The Wikipedia has the following information about this codepoint:

An amphora (; Ancient Greek: ἀμφορεύς, romanized: amphoreús; English PL amphorae or amphoras) is a type of container with a pointed bottom and characteristic shape and size which fit tightly (and therefore safely) against each other in storage rooms and packages, tied together with rope and delivered by land or sea. The size and shape have been determined from at least as early as the Neolithic Period. Amphorae were used in vast numbers for the transport and storage of various products, both liquid and dry, but mostly for wine. They are most often ceramic, but examples in metals and other materials have been found. Versions of the amphorae were one of many shapes used in Ancient Greek vase painting.

The amphora complements a vase, the pithos, which makes available capacities between one-half and two and one-half tons. In contrast, the amphora holds under a half-ton, typically less than 50 kilograms (110 lb). The bodies of the two types have similar shapes. Where the pithos may have multiple small loops or lugs for fastening a rope harness, the amphora has two expansive handles joining the shoulder of the body and a long neck. The necks of pithoi are wide for scooping or bucket access. The necks of amphorae are narrow for pouring by a person holding it by the bottom and a handle. Some variants exist. The handles might not be present. The size may require two or three handlers to lift. For the most part, however, an amphora was tableware, or sat close to the table, was intended to be seen, and was finely decorated as such by master painters.

Stoppers of perishable materials, which have rarely survived, were used to seal the contents. Two principal types of amphorae existed: the neck amphora, in which the neck and body meet at a sharp angle; and the one-piece amphora, in which the neck and body form a continuous curve upwards. Neck amphorae were commonly used in the early history of ancient Greece, but were gradually replaced by the one-piece type from around the 7th century BC onward.

Most were produced with a pointed base to allow upright storage by embedding in soft ground, such as sand. The base facilitated transport by ship, where the amphorae were packed upright or on their sides in as many as five staggered layers. If upright, the bases probably were held by some sort of rack, and ropes passed through their handles to prevent shifting or toppling during rough seas. Heather and reeds might be used as packing around the vases. Racks could be used in kitchens and shops. The base also concentrated deposits from liquids with suspended solid particles, such as olive oil and wines.

Amphorae are of great use to maritime archaeologists, as they often indicate the age of a shipwreck and the geographic origin of the cargo. They are occasionally so well preserved that the original content is still present, providing information on foodstuffs and mercantile systems. Amphorae were too cheap and plentiful to return to their origin-point and so, when empty, they were broken up at their destination. At a breakage site in Rome, Testaccio, close to the Tiber, the fragments, later wetted with calcium hydroxide (calce viva), remained to create a hill now named Monte Testaccio, 45 m (148 ft) high and more than 1 kilometre in circumference.

Representations

System Representation
127994
UTF-8 F0 9F 8F BA
UTF-16 D8 3C DF FA
UTF-32 00 01 F3 FA
URL-Quoted %F0%9F%8F%BA
HTML hex reference 🏺
Wrong windows-1252 Mojibake 🏺

Elsewhere

Complete Record

Property Value
Age 8.0 (2015)
Unicode Name AMPHORA
Unicode 1 Name
Block Miscellaneous Symbols and Arrows
General Category Other Symbol
Script Common
Bidirectional Category Other Neutral
Combining Class Not Reordered
Decomposition Type None
Decomposition Mapping Glyph for U+1F3FA Amphora
Lowercase
Simple Lowercase Mapping Glyph for U+1F3FA Amphora
Lowercase Mapping Glyph for U+1F3FA Amphora
Uppercase
Simple Uppercase Mapping Glyph for U+1F3FA Amphora
Uppercase Mapping Glyph for U+1F3FA Amphora
Simple Titlecase Mapping Glyph for U+1F3FA Amphora
Titlecase Mapping Glyph for U+1F3FA Amphora
Case Folding Glyph for U+1F3FA Amphora
ASCII Hex Digit
Alphabetic
Bidi Control
Bidi Mirrored
Composition Exclusion
Case Ignorable
Changes When Casefolded
Changes When Casemapped
Changes When NFKC Casefolded
Changes When Lowercased
Changes When Titlecased
Changes When Uppercased
Cased
Full Composition Exclusion
Default Ignorable Code Point
Dash
Deprecated
Diacritic
Emoji Modifier Base
Emoji Component
Emoji Modifier
Emoji Presentation
Emoji
Extender
Extended Pictographic
FC NFKC Closure Glyph for U+1F3FA Amphora
Grapheme Cluster Break Any
Grapheme Base
Grapheme Extend
Grapheme Link
Hex Digit
Hyphen
ID Continue
ID Start
IDS Binary Operator
IDS Trinary Operator and
IDSU 0
ID_Compat_Math_Continue 0
ID_Compat_Math_Start 0
Ideographic
InCB None
Indic Mantra Category
Indic Positional Category NA
Indic Syllabic Category Other
Jamo Short Name
Join Control
Logical Order Exception
Math
Noncharacter Code Point
NFC Quick Check Yes
NFD Quick Check Yes
NFKC Casefold Glyph for U+1F3FA Amphora
NFKC Quick Check Yes
NFKC_SCF Glyph for U+1F3FA Amphora
NFKD Quick Check Yes
Other Alphabetic
Other Default Ignorable Code Point
Other Grapheme Extend
Other ID Continue
Other ID Start
Other Lowercase
Other Math
Other Uppercase
Prepended Concatenation Mark
Pattern Syntax
Pattern White Space
Quotation Mark
Regional Indicator
Radical
Sentence Break Other
Soft Dotted
Sentence Terminal
Terminal Punctuation
Unified Ideograph
Variation Selector
Word Break Other
White Space
XID Continue
XID Start
Expands On NFC
Expands On NFD
Expands On NFKC
Expands On NFKD
Bidi Paired Bracket Glyph for U+1F3FA Amphora
Bidi Paired Bracket Type None
East Asian Width Wide
Hangul Syllable Type Not Applicable
ISO 10646 Comment
Joining Group No_Joining_Group
Joining Type Non Joining
Line Break Ideographic
Numeric Type None
Numeric Value not a number
Simple Case Folding Glyph for U+1F3FA Amphora
Script Extension
Vertical Orientation U