πŸƒ‘

U+1F0D1 PLAYING CARD ACE OF CLUBS

U+1F0D1 was added to Unicode in version 6.0 (2010). It belongs to the block Playing Cards in the Supplementary Multilingual Plane.

This character is a Other Symbol and is commonly used, that is, in no specific script.

The glyph is not a composition. It has a Neutral East Asian Width. In bidirectional context it acts as Other Neutral and is not mirrored. In text U+1F0D1 behaves as Ideographic regarding line breaks. It has type Other for sentence and Other for word breaks. The Grapheme Cluster Break is Any.

The Wikipedia has the following information about this codepoint:

An ace is a playing card. In the standard French deck, an ace has a single suit symbol (a heart, diamond, spade, or club) located in the middle of the card, sometimes large and decorated, especially in the case of the Ace of Spades. This embellishment on the Ace of Spades started when King James VI of Scotland and I of England required an insignia of the printing house to be printed on the Ace of Spades. This insignia was necessary for identifying the printing house and stamping it as having paid the new stamp tax. Although this requirement was abolished in 1960, the tradition has been kept by many card makers. In other countries the stamp and embellishments are usually found on ace cards; clubs in France, diamonds in Russia, hearts in Genoa.

The word "ace" comes from the Old French word as (from Latin 'as') meaning 'a unit', from the name of a small Roman coin. It originally meant the side of a die with only one mark, before it was a term for a playing card. Since this was the lowest roll of the die, it traditionally meant 'bad luck' in Middle English, but as the ace is often the highest playing card, its meaning has since changed to mean 'high-quality, excellence'. This connotation has seen the word applied to an unreachable tennis serve, a successful fighter pilot and more generally as a person proficient in his or her field, especially a sporting field.

Historically, the ace had the lowest value and this still holds in many popular European games (in fact many European decks, including the French and Latin suited decks, do not use the "A" index, instead keeping the numeral "1"). The modern convention of "ace high" seemed to have happened in stages. Card games, before they arrived in Europe, had suits that were in reverse ranking. In the Chinese game of Mǎ diΓ o, which lacked court cards, the suit of coins was inverted so the 1 of Coins was the highest in its suit. In the Ganjifa games of Persia, India, and Arabia, only the pip cards of half the suits were reversed so the 1 ranked just below the lowest court card. This convention carried over to early European games like Ombre, Maw, and Trionfi (Tarot). During the 15th and 16th centuries, the ranking of all suits were becoming progressive. A few games from this period like Γ‰cartΓ© and Triomphe, a simplified version of trionfi, has the ace between the ten and the jack. In the "Ace-Ten" games like Pinochle and Sixty-six, the ace dragged the 10 along with it to the top so the ranking became A-10-K. Some games promoted the deuces and treys too like Put, Truc, and Tressette. "King high" games were still being made in the 17th century, for example Cribbage. Many games, such as poker and blackjack, allow the player to choose whether the ace is used as a high or low card. This duality allows players in some other games to use it as both at once; some variants of Rummy allow players to form groups, or "melds", of rank K-A-2 or similar. This is known colloquially as "going around the corner".

It was not only the French deck which experienced this promotion, but some games involving the Swiss and German deck also evolved into using the daus (deuce) as the highest card. The ass (ace) and daus were conflated into a single card and the names are used interchangeably along with sau (sow) as early cards of that rank depicted a pig. Some decks in southern Germany use "A" for the index because "D" is reserved for Dame (Queen) in French suited decks. Confusion is also avoided as German suited decks lack numbered cards below "7" or "6". Despite using French suited cards, Russians call the ace a deuce (tuz), a vestige of a period when German cards were predominant in central and eastern Europe.

Representations

System Representation
NΒΊ 127185
UTF-8 F0 9F 83 91
UTF-16 D8 3C DC D1
UTF-32 00 01 F0 D1
URL-Quoted %F0%9F%83%91
HTML-Escape 🃑
Wrong windows-1252 Mojibake Γ°ΒŸΒƒΒ‘

Elsewhere

Complete Record

Property Value
Age (age) 6.0
Unicode Name (na) PLAYING CARD ACE OF CLUBS
Unicode 1 Name (na1) β€”
Block (blk) Playing_Cards
General Category (gc) Other Symbol
Script (sc) Common
Bidirectional Category (bc) Other Neutral
Combining Class (ccc) Not Reordered
Decomposition Type (dt) None
Decomposition Mapping (dm) πŸƒ‘
Lowercase (Lower) ✘
Simple Lowercase Mapping (slc) πŸƒ‘
Lowercase Mapping (lc) πŸƒ‘
Uppercase (Upper) ✘
Simple Uppercase Mapping (suc) πŸƒ‘
Uppercase Mapping (uc) πŸƒ‘
Simple Titlecase Mapping (stc) πŸƒ‘
Titlecase Mapping (tc) πŸƒ‘
Case Folding (cf) πŸƒ‘
ASCII Hex Digit (AHex) ✘
Alphabetic (Alpha) ✘
Bidi Control (Bidi_C) ✘
Bidi Mirrored (Bidi_M) ✘
Bidi Paired Bracket (bpb) πŸƒ‘
Bidi Paired Bracket Type (bpt) None
Cased (Cased) ✘
Composition Exclusion (CE) ✘
Case Ignorable (CI) ✘
Full Composition Exclusion (Comp_Ex) ✘
Changes When Casefolded (CWCF) ✘
Changes When Casemapped (CWCM) ✘
Changes When NFKC Casefolded (CWKCF) ✘
Changes When Lowercased (CWL) ✘
Changes When Titlecased (CWT) ✘
Changes When Uppercased (CWU) ✘
Dash (Dash) ✘
Deprecated (Dep) ✘
Default Ignorable Code Point (DI) ✘
Diacritic (Dia) ✘
East Asian Width (ea) Neutral
Extender (Ext) ✘
FC NFKC Closure (FC_NFKC) πŸƒ‘
Grapheme Cluster Break (GCB) Any
Grapheme Base (Gr_Base) βœ”
Grapheme Extend (Gr_Ext) ✘
Hex Digit (Hex) ✘
Hangul Syllable Type (hst) Not Applicable
Hyphen (Hyphen) ✘
ID Continue (IDC) ✘
Ideographic (Ideo) ✘
ID Start (IDS) ✘
IDS Binary Operator (IDSB) ✘
IDS Trinary Operator and (IDST) ✘
InMC (InMC) β€”
Indic Positional Category (InPC) NA
Indic Syllabic Category (InSC) Other
ISO 10646 Comment (isc) β€”
Joining Group (jg) No_Joining_Group
Join Control (Join_C) ✘
Jamo Short Name (JSN) β€”
Joining Type (jt) Non Joining
Line Break (lb) Ideographic
Logical Order Exception (LOE) ✘
Math (Math) ✘
Noncharacter Code Point (NChar) ✘
NFC Quick Check (NFC_QC) Yes
NFD Quick Check (NFD_QC) Yes
NFKC Casefold (NFKC_CF) πŸƒ‘
NFKC Quick Check (NFKC_QC) Yes
NFKD Quick Check (NFKD_QC) Yes
Numeric Type (nt) None
Numeric Value (nv) NaN
Other Alphabetic (OAlpha) ✘
Other Default Ignorable Code Point (ODI) ✘
Other Grapheme Extend (OGr_Ext) ✘
Other ID Continue (OIDC) ✘
Other ID Start (OIDS) ✘
Other Lowercase (OLower) ✘
Other Math (OMath) ✘
Other Uppercase (OUpper) ✘
Pattern Syntax (Pat_Syn) ✘
Pattern White Space (Pat_WS) ✘
Quotation Mark (QMark) ✘
Radical (Radical) ✘
Sentence Break (SB) Other
Simple Case Folding (scf) πŸƒ‘
Script Extension (scx) Common
Soft Dotted (SD) ✘
STerm (STerm) ✘
Terminal Punctuation (Term) ✘
Unified Ideograph (UIdeo) ✘
Variation Selector (VS) ✘
Word Break (WB) Other
White Space (WSpace) ✘
XID Continue (XIDC) ✘
XID Start (XIDS) ✘
Expands On NFC (XO_NFC) ✘
Expands On NFD (XO_NFD) ✘
Expands On NFKC (XO_NFKC) ✘
Expands On NFKD (XO_NFKD) ✘