Home U+1F100 to U+1F1FF Enclosed Alphanumeric Supplement
Glyph for U+1F198
Source: Noto Emoji

U+1F198 Squared Sos

U+1F198 was added to Unicode in version 6.0 (2010). It belongs to the block U+1F100 to U+1F1FF Enclosed Alphanumeric Supplement in the U+10000 to U+1FFFF Supplementary Multilingual Plane.

This character is a Other Symbol and is commonly used, that is, in no specific script. The character is also known as search and hunt for missing person.

The glyph is not a composition. It has a Wide East Asian Width. In bidirectional context it acts as Left To Right and is not mirrored. In text U+1F198 behaves as Ambiguous (Alphabetic or Ideographic) regarding line breaks. It has type Other for sentence and Other for word breaks. The Grapheme Cluster Break is Any.

The CLDR project labels this character “SOS button” for use in screen reading software. It assigns additional tags, e.g. for search in emoji pickers: help, SOS, SOS button.

This character is designated as an emoji. It will be rendered as colorful emoji on conforming platforms. To reduce it to a monochrome character, you can combine it with Glyph for U+FE0E Variation Selector-15: 🆘︎ See the Emojipedia for more details on this character’s emoji properties.

The Wikipedia has the following information about this codepoint:

SOS is a Morse code distress signal (  ▄ ▄ ▄ ▄▄▄ ▄▄▄ ▄▄▄ ▄ ▄ ▄ ), used internationally, that was originally established for maritime use. In formal notation SOS is written with an overscore line, to indicate that the Morse code equivalents for the individual letters of "SOS" are transmitted as an unbroken sequence of three dots / three dashes / three dots, with no spaces between the letters. In International Morse Code three dots form the letter "S" and three dashes make the letter "O", so "S O S" became a common way to remember the order of the dots and dashes. (IWB, VZE, 3B, and V7 form equivalent sequences, but traditionally SOS is the easiest to remember.)

SOS, when it was first agreed upon by the International Radio Telegraphic Convention in 1906, was merely a distinctive Morse code sequence and was initially not an abbreviation. Later in popular usage it became associated with mnemonic phrases such as "Save Our Souls" and "Save Our Ship". Moreover, due to its high-profile use in emergencies, the phrase "SOS" has entered general usage to informally indicate a crisis or the need for action.

SOS originated in German government maritime radio regulations adopted effective 1 April 1905. It became a worldwide standard when it was included in the service regulations of the first International Radiotelegraph Convention and signed on 3 November 1906, which became effective on 1 July 1908. In modern terminology, SOS is a Morse "procedural signal" or "prosign", used as a start-of-message mark for transmissions requesting assistance when loss of life or catastrophic loss of property is imminent. Other prefixes are used for mechanical breakdowns, requests for medical assistance, and a relayed distress signal originally sent by another station. SOS remained the maritime radio distress signal until 1999, when it was replaced by the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System.

SOS is still recognized as a standard distress signal that may be used with any signaling method. It has been used as a visual distress signal, consisting of three short/three long/three short flashes of light, such as from a survival mirror. In some cases the individual letters "S O S" have been spelled out, for example, stamped in a snowbank or formed out of logs on a beach. "S O S" being readable upside down as well as right side up (as an ambigram) is an advantage for visual recognition.

Representations

System Representation
127384
UTF-8 F0 9F 86 98
UTF-16 D8 3C DD 98
UTF-32 00 01 F1 98
URL-Quoted %F0%9F%86%98
HTML-Escape 🆘
Wrong windows-1252 Mojibake 🆘
alias search
alias hunt for missing person

Elsewhere

Complete Record

Property Value
Age 6.0 (2010)
Unicode Name SQUARED SOS
Unicode 1 Name
Block Enclosed Alphanumeric Supplement
General Category Other Symbol
Script Common
Bidirectional Category Left To Right
Combining Class Not Reordered
Decomposition Type None
Decomposition Mapping Glyph for U+1F198 Squared Sos
Lowercase
Simple Lowercase Mapping Glyph for U+1F198 Squared Sos
Lowercase Mapping Glyph for U+1F198 Squared Sos
Uppercase
Simple Uppercase Mapping Glyph for U+1F198 Squared Sos
Uppercase Mapping Glyph for U+1F198 Squared Sos
Simple Titlecase Mapping Glyph for U+1F198 Squared Sos
Titlecase Mapping Glyph for U+1F198 Squared Sos
Case Folding Glyph for U+1F198 Squared Sos
ASCII Hex Digit
Alphabetic
Bidi Control
Bidi Mirrored
Composition Exclusion
Case Ignorable
Changes When Casefolded
Changes When Casemapped
Changes When NFKC Casefolded
Changes When Lowercased
Changes When Titlecased
Changes When Uppercased
Cased
Full Composition Exclusion
Default Ignorable Code Point
Dash
Deprecated
Diacritic
Emoji Modifier Base
Emoji Component
Emoji Modifier
Emoji Presentation
Emoji
Extender
Extended Pictographic
FC NFKC Closure Glyph for U+1F198 Squared Sos
Grapheme Cluster Break Any
Grapheme Base
Grapheme Extend
Grapheme Link
Hex Digit
Hyphen
ID Continue
ID Start
IDS Binary Operator
IDS Trinary Operator and
Ideographic
Indic Mantra Category
Indic Positional Category NA
Indic Syllabic Category Other
Jamo Short Name
Join Control
Logical Order Exception
Math
Noncharacter Code Point
NFC Quick Check Yes
NFD Quick Check Yes
NFKC Casefold Glyph for U+1F198 Squared Sos
NFKC Quick Check Yes
NFKD Quick Check Yes
Other Alphabetic
Other Default Ignorable Code Point
Other Grapheme Extend
Other ID Continue
Other ID Start
Other Lowercase
Other Math
Other Uppercase
Prepended Concatenation Mark
Pattern Syntax
Pattern White Space
Quotation Mark
Regional Indicator
Radical
Sentence Break Other
Soft Dotted
Sentence Terminal
Terminal Punctuation
Unified Ideograph
Variation Selector
Word Break Other
White Space
XID Continue
XID Start
Expands On NFC
Expands On NFD
Expands On NFKC
Expands On NFKD
Bidi Paired Bracket Glyph for U+1F198 Squared Sos
Bidi Paired Bracket Type None
East Asian Width Wide
Hangul Syllable Type Not Applicable
ISO 10646 Comment
Joining Group No_Joining_Group
Joining Type Non Joining
Line Break Ambiguous (Alphabetic or Ideographic)
Numeric Type None
Numeric Value not a number
Simple Case Folding Glyph for U+1F198 Squared Sos
Script Extension
Vertical Orientation U