Home U+2600 to U+26FF Miscellaneous Symbols
Glyph for U+2687
Source: Noto Sans Symbols2

U+2687 WHITE CIRCLE WITH TWO DOTS

U+2687 was added to Unicode in version 3.2 (2002). It belongs to the block U+2600 to U+26FF Miscellaneous Symbols in the U+0000 to U+FFFF Basic Multilingual Plane.

This character is a Other Symbol and is commonly used, that is, in no specific script.

The glyph is not a composition. It has a Neutral East Asian Width. In bidirectional context it acts as Other Neutral and is not mirrored. In text U+2687 behaves as Alphabetic regarding line breaks. It has type Other for sentence and Other for word breaks. The Grapheme Cluster Break is Any.

The Wikipedia has the following information about this codepoint:

Go is an abstract strategy board game for two players in which the aim is to surround more territory than the opponent. The game was invented in China more than 2,500 years ago and is believed to be the oldest board game continuously played to the present day. A 2016 survey by the International Go Federation's 75 member nations found that there are over 46 million people worldwide who know how to play Go and over 20 million current players, the majority of whom live in East Asia.

The playing pieces are called stones. One player uses the white stones and the other, black. The players take turns placing the stones on the vacant intersections (points) of a board. Once placed on the board, stones may not be moved, but stones are removed from the board if the stone (or group of stones) is surrounded by opposing stones on all orthogonally adjacent points, in which case the stone or group is captured. The game proceeds until neither player wishes to make another move. When a game concludes, the winner is determined by counting each player's surrounded territory along with captured stones and komi (points added to the score of the player with the white stones as compensation for playing second). Games may also be terminated by resignation.

The standard Go board has a 19×19 grid of lines, containing 361 points. Beginners often play on smaller 9×9 and 13×13 boards, and archaeological evidence shows that the game was played in earlier centuries on a board with a 17×17 grid. However, boards with a 19×19 grid had become standard by the time the game reached Korea in the 5th century CE and Japan in the 7th century CE.

Go was considered one of the four essential arts of the cultured aristocratic Chinese scholars in antiquity. The earliest written reference to the game is generally recognized as the historical annal Zuo Zhuan (c. 4th century BCE).

Despite its relatively simple rules, Go is extremely complex. Compared to chess, Go has both a larger board with more scope for play and longer games and, on average, many more alternatives to consider per move. The number of legal board positions in Go has been calculated to be approximately 2.1×10170, which is vastly greater than the number of atoms in the observable universe, estimated to be of the order of 1080.

Representations

System Representation
9863
UTF-8 E2 9A 87
UTF-16 26 87
UTF-32 00 00 26 87
URL-Quoted %E2%9A%87
HTML-Escape ⚇
Wrong windows-1252 Mojibake ⚇

Elsewhere

Complete Record

Property Value
Age 3.2 (2002)
Unicode Name WHITE CIRCLE WITH TWO DOTS
Unicode 1 Name
Block Miscellaneous Symbols and Pictographs
General Category Other Symbol
Script Common
Bidirectional Category Other Neutral
Combining Class Not Reordered
Decomposition Type None
Decomposition Mapping Glyph for U+2687 White Circle with Two Dots
Lowercase
Simple Lowercase Mapping Glyph for U+2687 White Circle with Two Dots
Lowercase Mapping Glyph for U+2687 White Circle with Two Dots
Uppercase
Simple Uppercase Mapping Glyph for U+2687 White Circle with Two Dots
Uppercase Mapping Glyph for U+2687 White Circle with Two Dots
Simple Titlecase Mapping Glyph for U+2687 White Circle with Two Dots
Titlecase Mapping Glyph for U+2687 White Circle with Two Dots
Case Folding Glyph for U+2687 White Circle with Two Dots
ASCII Hex Digit
Alphabetic
Bidi Control
Bidi Mirrored
Composition Exclusion
Case Ignorable
Changes When Casefolded
Changes When Casemapped
Changes When NFKC Casefolded
Changes When Lowercased
Changes When Titlecased
Changes When Uppercased
Cased
Full Composition Exclusion
Default Ignorable Code Point
Dash
Deprecated
Diacritic
Emoji Modifier Base
Emoji Component
Emoji Modifier
Emoji Presentation
Emoji
Extender
Extended Pictographic
FC NFKC Closure Glyph for U+2687 White Circle with Two Dots
Grapheme Cluster Break Any
Grapheme Base
Grapheme Extend
Grapheme Link
Hex Digit
Hyphen
ID Continue
ID Start
IDS Binary Operator
IDS Trinary Operator and
Ideographic
Indic Mantra Category
Indic Positional Category NA
Indic Syllabic Category Other
Jamo Short Name
Join Control
Logical Order Exception
Math
Noncharacter Code Point
NFC Quick Check Yes
NFD Quick Check Yes
NFKC Casefold Glyph for U+2687 White Circle with Two Dots
NFKC Quick Check Yes
NFKD Quick Check Yes
Other Alphabetic
Other Default Ignorable Code Point
Other Grapheme Extend
Other ID Continue
Other ID Start
Other Lowercase
Other Math
Other Uppercase
Prepended Concatenation Mark
Pattern Syntax
Pattern White Space
Quotation Mark
Regional Indicator
Radical
Sentence Break Other
Soft Dotted
Sentence Terminal
Terminal Punctuation
Unified Ideograph
Variation Selector
Word Break Other
White Space
XID Continue
XID Start
Expands On NFC
Expands On NFD
Expands On NFKC
Expands On NFKD
Bidi Paired Bracket Glyph for U+2687 White Circle with Two Dots
Bidi Paired Bracket Type None
East Asian Width Neutral
Hangul Syllable Type Not Applicable
ISO 10646 Comment
Joining Group No_Joining_Group
Joining Type Non Joining
Line Break Alphabetic
Numeric Type None
Numeric Value not a number
Simple Case Folding Glyph for U+2687 White Circle with Two Dots
Script Extension
Vertical Orientation U